SKILLS FOR THE FUTURE

“We need to know about more than school attendance and academic grades if we are to meet young people’s needs.” – Professor Johanna Wyn, Director Youth Research Centre, The University of Melbourne.

The ongoing measurement of the growth of the skills young people need to succeed in work and life in the 21st Century is critical to our best practice methodology.

We track the progress of students from when they first enter HOL and again each term throughout the year.

The result is a much more comprehensive picture of outcomes for young people than is possible to capture in blunt measures like attendance or NAPLAN.

building the platform bar chart 2014

 

PIONEERING NEW MEASUREMENT

As a founding partner in the Australian Research Council national research project ‘Building Futures for Young Australians‘ we have helped develop a new tool to measure what works to keep kids engaged at school.

HOL typically supports disengaging students who are not enjoying school and/or not finding it meaningful.

The ARC project, led by the University of Melbourne, pioneers the concept of enabling spaces, and a Connections, Capacities and Meanings (CCM) framework to measure what works to keep vulnerable kids at school.

CCM framework

Research shows that these three factors can be used to describe the impact of programs like HOL that seek to help young people stay connected to school.

For the first time the personal impact on kids of participating in HOL is compared with results for non HOL students attending a regular day of school.

Over 500 responses of HOL students were compared with over 3,500 responses of high schools students with HOL responses dramatically different – at statistically significant levels (p<0.001), on all measures.

The responses by HOL students to how much their day at school mattered or was part of something important was 65% for HOL vs 45% for a standard class, how useful students felt today was 72% for HOL responses vs 47%, enjoyed school 73% for HOL vs 44%, felt effective 75% vs 45%, and felt included 82% vs 42%.

Read the full report here.